Skip to content

Instantly share code, notes, and snippets.

@ivan
Last active February 8, 2024 21:49
  • Star 3 You must be signed in to star a gist
  • Fork 0 You must be signed in to fork a gist
Star You must be signed in to star a gist
Save ivan/5095670735ba941a6090a69fce4183df to your computer and use it in GitHub Desktop.
2023 reading list

[This page is best viewed with https://github.com/ludios/expand-everything, which will load all the comnents below.]

Wherein I try to prioritize reading for the limited amount of time I have this year, and to remind myself to read more than just comments on the Internet. Because of problems of time and shifting interests, I will consider this a success if I read a third of the list. I'll reflect on the reading and deviations from the plan in Jan 2024.

{+} = added after initial planning






  • Albert Camus - The Fall/ audio
  • {+} John Kennedy Toole - A Confederacy of Dunces/ audio, go to 6m44s to skip past the introduction spoilers
  • {+} pirate aba - The Wandering Inn/ audio
  • William Olaf Stapledon - Star Maker/ audio, go to 12m35s to skip past the introduction spoilers

  • Tae Kim - A Guide to Japanese Grammar
  • Noboru Akuzawa - Japanese Sentence Patterns Training Book for JLPT N5
  • Noboru Akuzawa - Japanese Sentence Patterns Training Book for JLPT N4
  • Jay Rubin - Making Sense of Japanese: What the Textbooks Don't Tell You/ the romaji is miserable; may have useful grammar insights
  • struggle through Japanese Wikipedia for some topics I know about
  • Daniele Minnone - A learning handbook for Joyo Kanji/ the first third, pg. 1 - 98

(my initial source for learning Japanese is https://cijapanese.com/ and not any of the reading.)


Lectures


maybe in 2024? not sure

  • {+} Paul Bourke - Fractals, Chaos, Self-Similarity
  • {+} Alex Komoroske - The Compendium / after I convert the Firebase export in code/websites/compendium-cards-data/db.json to a single HTML page
  • {+} James Betker - Non_Interactive
  • {+} Denny Britz’s Blog
  • {+} Robert Root-Bernstein - Discovering: Inventing and Solving Problems at the Frontiers of Scientific Knowledge
  • {+} Steven H. Strogatz - Infinite Powers: How Calculus Reveals the Secrets of the Universe
  • {+} Lexi Mattick & Hack Club - Putting the “You” in CPU
  • Lou Keep - The Uruk Series
  • Knut Schmidt-Nielsen - How Animals Work (via)
  • Edward O. Wilson - The Diversity of Life
  • James L. Gould, Carol Grant Gould - The Animal Mind (via)
  • Symbols and mental programs: a hypothesis about human singularity/ printed
  • Robert Yarham - How to Read the Landscape
  • Richard Powers - The Overstory/ audio
  • Rigdzin Shikpo - Openness Clarity Sensitivity/ printed
  • Michael R. Canfield (editor) - Field Notes on Science & Nature (via)
  • Sabine Hossenfelder - Existential Physics
  • George Soros - The Alchemy of Finance/ printed
  • Eric Gill - An Essay on Typography/ printed; I know he's bad
  • {+} Richard Hamming - The Art of Doing Science and Engineering

unplanned cool things read


unplanned and abandoned

  • Chuck Klosterman - The Nineties/ audio
  • Rick Rubin - The Creative Act/ audio
  • Mike Rinder - A Billion Years: My Escape From a Life in the Highest Ranks of Scientology/ audio
  • Sarah Steel - Do As I Say: How Cults Control, Why We Join Them, and What They Teach Us About Bullying, Abuse and Coercion/ audio
  • Benjamín Labatut - When We Cease to Understand the World/ audio
  • Kathryn Petras, Ross Petras - Awkword Moments: A Lively Guide to the 100 Terms Smart People Should Know/ audio
  • Adam Galinsky, Maurice Schweitzer - Friend & Foe: When to Cooperate, When to Compete, and How to Succeed at Both/ audio
  • Han Kang - The White Book/ audio
  • Niccolò Machiavelli - The Prince/ audio
  • Anthony Bourdain - Kitchen Confidential: Adventures in the Culinary Underbelly/ audio
  • Kristie Macrakis - Espionage/ audio
  • Christopher Winn - Legal Daisy Spacing (via)
  • Justin E. H. Smith - The Internet Is Not What You Think It Is/ audio
  • Alice Schroeder - The Snowball: Warren Buffett and the Business of Life/ audio (~77% in)
  • Morgan Housel - Same as Ever/ audio
  • Amanda Montell - Cultish: The Language of Fanaticism/ audio
@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Nov 28, 2023

pondering: how do you make progress and remain motivated on a ambitious solo project that 1) is very difficult 2) takes years?

most annoying (but possibly true) answer: out of love lol

https://twitter.com/grantbels/status/1727419690249773186

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Nov 28, 2023

I've met ruthless dark triad people who I correctly predicted would be extremely successful, but I would make sure never to be work with or for.

https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=38390030

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Nov 28, 2023

the road to “hell yeah” involves saying no to a lot of “maybe”s

tragically, it also involves saying no to some “but it’s SOOO CLOSE”s

https://twitter.com/meansinfinity/status/1727954442295931247

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Nov 28, 2023

There is a specific rhetorical style that people use when they want to terrify you into thinking that what they want you to pay attention to is the only thing that matters

It’s really tricky to notice the emotional effect of this style and see it as a mark of low credibility

https://twitter.com/sashachapin/status/1727810010552610886

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Nov 28, 2023

ChatGPT is trained to be sycophantic and bullshit confidently about any subject. it kind of feels like being lovebombed

https://twitter.com/deepfates/status/1728305515812605984

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Nov 28, 2023

i am once again begging you to stop brute forcing your psyche into altered states of being that bypass your load-bearing psychological defenses and lead to the construction of new pathways that are, best case, inherently unstable, or worst case, destabilizing to the entire system

https://twitter.com/_ali_taylor/status/1612909841239908361

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Nov 28, 2023

there's this big rationalist norm where you're supposed to take the "outside view" a lot and kinda average your opinion with other people's opinions and i think it sucks actually. you're reneging on your responsibility as a thinker by double-counting other people's thoughts

like, you are already exposed to other people's thoughts and those thoughts already have an effect on yours in the native mental architecture, there's no need to top-down impose a second round of effects. your job as a thinker is to alchemize what you've experienced

in practice what this norm mostly ended up doing was producing an intelligence status ladder where people had a rough sense of who was like "the most rational" (although we didn't call it that) and you were supposed to defer to people's opinions higher up on the ladder

that was awful and in practice taught people to ignore their own knowing and substitute other people's. i may disagree with yann lecun object-level but meta-level he's doing his job as a thinker by sticking to his guns and calling it like he sees it

https://twitter.com/QiaochuYuan/status/1728527049105838499

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Nov 28, 2023

@cmuratori I'm trying to write a game UI system (immediate mode) as an exercise and I'm wondering whether you had any pointers about layout / positioning. I'd like to end up with something that looks right on various aspect ratios, and the fundamentals of a layout system escape me..

I'm not sure exactly what you mean, but something that can be very helpful if you are not familiar with it is to read up on the original principles of typography. This can be very helpful to gain a baseline (pun intended) understanding of what a layout system is trying to do.

The typographic parts are the ones I'm familiar with, but I can't come up with a nice mental model for how the layout should work for say an inventory screen - should I do like macOS AutoLayout and add constraints between pairs of objects, or should I do like CSS?..

Always hand-code. This is a classic trap for UI design, and it always ends in disaster :) The minute you think you can generically describe typography, it's game over.

So the goal of systems like this is to make it easy for someone to code a bunch of decision-like things into their design. Things like "try putting this in the lower corner and stacking them horizontally, but if it turns out that that would go past the middle of the screen, then split the group in half and put them on top. If the number is odd, then make a triangle instead." Etc., etc.

This is how actual typography works. The ideas behind things like CSS, Qt, MacOS, etc. are all just bad and don't actually work if you actually want things to be good.

https://twitter.com/cmuratori/status/1729035818235539904

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Nov 28, 2023

Web push is basically useless because Google hasn't prioritized fixing the issues causing Android to delay the notifications by 10 minutes or more. They are basically only useful for "re-engagement" spam, nothing time critical.

https://bugs.chromium.org/p/chromium/issues/detail?id=777106

There are a whole bunch of sad bugs about Web Push in the issue tracker. It's disappointingly typical of the PWA APIs. They sound like they have the capabilities you need until you try to use them and uncover a minefield of five year old known issues that will never be fixed.

https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=38430581

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Nov 28, 2023

He was, however, more eccentric than I had expected. He was a maverick. Even though there was nothing contentious about his research, he objected in principle to having it reviewed by the university research ethics committee, whose purpose is to protect the safety and well-being of experiment subjects.

He requested a meeting with the committee. I was not present but was told that he had questioned the authority and expertise of the committee members, had insisted that he alone was in a position to judge whether his research was ethical and that, in any case, he was fully capable of making such decisions himself. He was impervious to the fact that subjects in psychological research had been, on occasion, subjected to bad experiences, and also to the fact that both the Canadian and United States governments had made these reviews mandatory. What was he doing! I managed to make light of this to myself by attributing it to his unbridled energy and fierce independence, which were, in many other ways, virtues. That was a mistake.

Another thing to which I did not give sufficient concern was his teaching. As the undergraduate chair, I read all teaching reviews. His were, for the most part, excellent and included eyebrow-raising comments such as “This course has changed my life.” One student, however, hated the course because he did not like “delivered truths.” Curious, I attended many of Jordan’s lectures to see for myself.

Remarkably, the 50 students always showed up at 9 a.m. and were held in rapt attention for an hour. Jordan was a captivating lecturer — electric and eclectic — cherry-picking from neuroscience, mythology, psychology, philosophy, the Bible and popular culture. The class loved him. But, as reported by that one astute student, Jordan presented conjecture as statement of fact. I expressed my concern to him about this a number of times, and each time Jordan agreed. He acknowledged the danger of such practices, but then continued to do it again and again, as if he could not control himself.

He was a preacher more than a teacher.

[...]

I rarely challenged him. He overwhelmed challenges with volumes of information that were hard to process and evaluate. He was more forceful than I, and had a much quicker mind.

https://www.thestar.com/opinion/i-was-jordan-peterson-s-strongest-supporter-now-i-think-he-s-dangerous/article_085724d2-94de-5fd2-81c3-b3b2822fd38a.html

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Nov 28, 2023

Most of the trades in that stock have been routed through dark pools (they don't hit lit exchanges), so even if there are (huge) trades you wouldn't necessarily see the price move.

Dark pool trades are reported to the FINRA TRF within at most 10 seconds and appear on the consolidated market data feed.

https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=38451374

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Nov 29, 2023

She created a world of her own, and we all have a place in it. Her influences are obvious (Y. Tiersen, J. Cage, E. Svensson, E. Satie, A. Pärt, B. Eno, P. Glass, L. Anderson), yet she has a very personal melodic "signature". A long journey into music is all we can wish for her, with confidence.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sp3B97N67Cw 'Hania Rani - @arteconcert's Piano Day'

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Nov 30, 2023

This is what I constantly tell my students: The hard part about doing a tech product for the most part isn't the what beginners think makes tech hard — the hard part is wrangling systemic complexity in a good, sustainable and reliable way.

Many non-tech people e.g. look at programmers and think the hard part is knowing what this garble of weird text means. But this is the easy part. And if you are a person who would think it is hard, you probably don't know about all the demons out there that will come to haunt you if you don't build a foundation that helps you actively keeping them away.

https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=38477399

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Nov 30, 2023

Analogies may be good for generating ideas, but treating them as a source of truth is a path to madness.

https://www.pathsensitive.com/2023/09/its-time-for-painkillers-vitamins-die.html

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Nov 30, 2023

Sounds as if the ANC is trying to cancel out its own sound.

https://crinacle.com/rankings/headphones/

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 1, 2023

There is an experience, the beginnings of which are described at the beginning of this post, which it feels accurate to describe as 'being attacked by a hell realm.' These experiences are something like Jhana, but for negative states. Tightly contracted attention on some aversive feeling tone in the body like helplessness, hopelessness, fear, separation/loneliness, disgust, etc. A solution to these problems is to open the aperture of attention wider to include neutral objects (most of the sensorium at any given time) but this doesn't feel available in the moment due to the threat of the fear object (tunnel vision etc.) A bunch of contemplative practices are oriented around making this degree of freedom on the attentional aperture available at all times. When it isn't directly available as an immediate move and all we have to work with are the contents themselves an analytical approach can be helpful. The underlying assumption that powers the whole investigation is that emotions are strategies to orient the organism usefully under some model of the world, and that those emotions won't be willing to pass until they're satisfied that we're actually dealing with the situation and not just pulling our usual bullshit of hand waving things we don't like away. This means investigating what the goal of the feeling is on the feeling's own terms, and feeling a genuine sense of connection and care for whatever that goal is, since it is some positive experience it wants you to have.

https://www.lesswrong.com/posts/nnCjjdXEXdRhzTAPE/buddhist-psychotechnology-for-withstanding-apocalypse-stress

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 1, 2023

but in German almost every other line has hyphenated words at the end (and I'm guessing in other languages with long composed words such as Finnish or Hungarian as well)

https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=38441747#38444096

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 1, 2023

Everything I’ve read about Musk and the hours of interviews with him indicates he’s got a singularly engineering mind. I’ve seen throughout my career the divide between those with engineering minds and the bizarre world of traditional advertising, replete with smoke and mirrors, fake air kisses and squishy talk of purpose and “lovemarks.” This isn’t Mars and Venus. This divide is galaxies away.

https://www.therebooting.com/p/message-recieved

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 1, 2023

Then, in July, just three months before the attacks, a veteran analyst with Unit 8200, Israel’s signals intelligence agency, warned that Hamas had conducted an intense, daylong training exercise that appeared similar to what was outlined in the blueprint.

But a colonel in the Gaza division brushed off her concerns, according to encrypted emails viewed by The Times.

“I utterly refute that the scenario is imaginary,” the analyst wrote in the email exchanges. The Hamas training exercise, she said, fully matched “the content of Jericho Wall.”

“It is a plan designed to start a war,” she added. “It’s not just a raid on a village.”

[...]

Underpinning all these failures was a single, fatally inaccurate belief that Hamas lacked the capability to attack and would not dare to do so. That belief was so ingrained in the Israeli government, officials said, that they disregarded growing evidence to the contrary.

[...]

The analyst warned that the drill closely followed the Jericho Wall plan, and that Hamas was building the capacity to carry it out.

The colonel in the Gaza division applauded the analysis but said the exercise was part of a “totally imaginative” scenario, not an indication of Hamas’s ability to pull it off.

“In short, let’s wait patiently,” the colonel wrote.

https://www.nytimes.com/2023/11/30/world/middleeast/israel-hamas-attack-intelligence.html

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 1, 2023

Unless I'm just parroting truisms here,

https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=38472124#38481897

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 1, 2023

given: A customer is a novel and stable pattern of human behavior.

thinking of apps as crude, and slow to evolve, pattern matchers

https://twitter.com/fkasummer/status/1729701349808292199

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 1, 2023

Developing exobrain systems that work for me in a pleasant rather than onerous, virtue based way.

[...]

frequency of hamster pellet checks (fb, email, messaging, etc.)

[...]

Realizing that I can't use the outputs of other people's processes as my process (as you would be doing if you tried to instantiate this list as a set of processes rather than using it as inspiration to examine your own life more closely)

https://www.lesswrong.com/posts/H5N5Npyd5udCtRwph/2017-an-actual-plan-to-actually-improve?commentId=nsAkLxux7zdH6zNZW

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 1, 2023

Say that I come to absolutely know you, but you do not know me. In this I gain complete power over you, and you will lack the ability to resist me.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zkiyz8QSnpI&t=19m

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 1, 2023

A mental movement I can recommend: looking at someone and deciding to take them absolutely seriously, like you are watching the main character of an extremely good movie.

https://twitter.com/FPallopides/status/1730700187058794804

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 3, 2023

Idris works on his phone six hours a night for about 400 Naira (87¢) an hour.” While he chats, he pretends to be the owner of the account, who is pretending to be a woman in the United States, who is pretending to be hundreds of virtual women.

https://arstechnica.com/culture/2023/05/this-is-catfishing-on-an-industrial-scale/

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 4, 2023

yes in fact I have structured my whole personality around such a self-referential satire to circumvent the trauma of being bullied for thinking

https://twitter.com/meekaale/status/1731719036403073403

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 4, 2023

Companies yearn for an ideal employee who is drunk on meaning, possessed by work, and spiritually immersed in their work persona, which has come to take over most if not all other parts of their identity.

https://www.fastcompany.com/90451328/are-you-a-spiritual-workaholic via https://twitter.com/animal/status/1217250339801436164 via https://twitter.com/search?q=%22drunk+on+meaning%22&src=spelling_expansion_revert_click

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 8, 2023

The most valuable gifts are primarily information. You're making a product recommendation that you're so confident in that you're willing to bet your own money that they'll like it.

https://twitter.com/moultano/status/1728803375590817858

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 9, 2023

V8 heap snapshots, saved as .heapsnapshot, can now be visualized in VS Code. There is both a traditional tabular view as well as a graphical representation of the retainers of a given memory object.

https://code.visualstudio.com/updates/v1_85#_javascript-debugger

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 10, 2023

The main thing SaaS companies do is navigate the politics of selling into businesses. The software is an implementation detail. So you can replicate the product, but you still have to do the (much harder) work of selling.

https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=38595864

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 11, 2023

they’re starting to teach “lowercase tweet-style” on LinkedIn now

https://twitter.com/nabeelqu/status/1734019137792294969

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 12, 2023

What programmers call "constant space" and what computational complexity theorists call "log space" are the same complexity class.

https://twitter.com/ModelOfTheory/status/1719423775207510403 via https://twitter.com/_Mira___Mira_/status/1725835451377004725

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 12, 2023

I increasingly consider avoiding anything that I know to have been hyper-optimised by a powerful entity to be a basic hygiene practice

https://twitter.com/utotranslucence/status/1734388325702906230

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 13, 2023

One thing that holds back working-class people when talking with "professional class" like lawyers or bigcorps is that they don't know the right way to ask for info. e.g. if you ask a lawyer what you should do legally, they will always give an absurdly safe answer that's useless

So, real life prompt engineering

https://twitter.com/MaikkiTao/status/1734691452549296543

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 13, 2023

During the second quarter of this year, SpaceX alone sent nearly 80 percent of world’s payload by mass into space, according to an analysis by one industry consultant, Bryce Tech.

https://www.nytimes.com/2023/11/19/us/politics/elon-musk-white-house-pentagon.html

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 13, 2023

When software engineers say "declarative" they generally mean that state changing operations are inferred from the existence of a description of the state.

In a way it feels 'opposite' to event sourcing where the desired state is produced from a sequence of events. When we are declarative, we must infer the sequence of events that given an origin state can produce the desired state.

When creating a declarative file format you realise that by storing the desired state in a declarative way (1) you lose things like an undo/version history, and (2) it's possible for it to be 'lossy': differing journeys to the same desired state can operate differently.

I've been thinking about this because I recently created a program that can export a backend or apply changes to it via a declarative YAML file. But these files are not backups as they are 'lossy' and there is sequence sensitivity with regard to how we reach the desired state.

Declarativeness can feel like a bit of a dark art, because you have to rely on heuristics and principles about what a 'good' journey to a particular desired state looks like.

For example, do you reparent items by deleting them and then recreating them with different identities belonging to a new parent or do you have a way of re-assigning them?

https://twitter.com/sebinsua/status/1728101060332646550

I think the greatest value in being declarative is:

  1. the ability to be certain about your eventual state
  2. retention only of intentional state, ideally with frequent purging of unintentional state

https://twitter.com/bgreysk/status/1728116280308429275

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 13, 2023

My recommendation is keep 14 days of [Vite output] bundles around, have a timestamp and force cutoff marker around and then bring up a bar to trigger reload / auto reload if can be done.

https://twitter.com/mitsuhiko/status/1730156753738731653

Client-side navigation can be buggy if you deploy a new version of your app while people are using it. If the code for the new page is already loaded, it may have stale content; if it isn't, the app's route manifest may point to a JavaScript file that no longer exists. SvelteKit helps you solve this problem through version management. If SvelteKit encounters an error while loading the page and detects that a new version has been deployed (using the name specified here, which defaults to a timestamp of the build) it will fall back to traditional full-page navigation. Not all navigations will result in an error though, for example if the JavaScript for the next page is already loaded.

https://kit.svelte.dev/docs/configuration#version

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 15, 2023

I'm trying to scam you, save yourself!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nn6eq_k2_4g&t=1362s

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 15, 2023

Munger (and Buffett) called this “the circle of competence” and often pointed out that the diameter of the circle doesn’t matter. What does matter is making sure you don’t fool yourself into thinking the diameter is wider than it is.

[...]

“Confucius said that real knowledge is knowing the extent of one’s ignorance…. Knowing what you don’t know is more useful than being brilliant.”

[...]

“Part of the reason I’ve been a little more successful than most people is I’m good at destroying my own best-loved ideas,” Munger told the Journal in 2019. “I knew early in life that that would be a useful knack and I’ve honed it all these years, so I’m pleased when I can destroy an idea that I’ve worked very hard on over a long period of time. And most people aren’t.”

https://archive.is/kPK8a / https://www.wsj.com/finance/investing/charlie-munger-life-money-ae3853ad

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 15, 2023

Every minute of every day each of us diligently works to build and fortify our personal reputations. Showing up on time. Being respectful. Offering sympathy. Helping out. Apologizing when at fault. Telling the truth. Our reputation is our life currency. Then, in one moment, a headline can cause everyone you love and care about to question everything they thought they knew about you. A lifetime of work now in question. It’s great entertainment when it’s about someone else; a different thing when it’s your name in the headline.

https://twitter.com/bryan_johnson/status/1734257098119356900

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 15, 2023

For a particular kind of person (which includes myself), trendspotting is a temptation.

If you’re an “infovore” with a systematic mind, if you like to collect and aggregate and organize information and data, but if maybe you’re not that original or creative yourself1, then you’ll gravitate to the kind of “research” or “writing” or “analysis” that’s essentially trendspotting.

Trendspotting in the broadest sense includes what I do with my regular, more sciencey posts: aggregating information about work that other people do.

I see it as a temptation because being an information aggregator is easier than being a creator. When your “work” is aggregating information, you get the exhilaration of feeling that you’ve been granted an aerial view, that you can see the whole of “what’s going on”, the “big picture.” It can give you the insidious sense that that you’re “above” the object-level toilers who spend their whole lives creating only one of the elements you file in your collection.

https://sarahconstantin.substack.com/p/2024-color-trends

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 15, 2023

The most conscientious employees in your organization are the most bitter. They see the quality issues, they often address them, and they get no recognition for doing so. When they speak up about quality concerns, they get treated like mouthbreathers who want to slow down. They watch the “move fast and break things” crowd get rewarded time after time, while they run around angrily cleaning up their messes. To these folks, it feels like giving a damn is a huge career liability in your organization. Because it is.

https://davidkcaudill.medium.com/maybe-getting-rid-of-your-qa-team-was-bad-actually-52c408bd048b via https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=38645856

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 15, 2023

The art critic John Berger once wrote that men in paintings act, women appear: 'Men look at women whereas women watch themselves being looked at.' And so it is with Harold Knight's prosaically titled 'Woman Reading,' from 1932.

https://twitter.com/ahistoryinart/status/1735611297859854532

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 15, 2023

But the magic happens in the mortar between the bricks. Sanding pieces together that don’t fit. Pouring elbow grease into the mix until you force things to work out of sheer will. Finding new and unintuitive ways to do things.

https://twitter.com/scottastevenson/status/1734981840866324961

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 15, 2023

every ‘market wizard’ has a mediocre track record after being featured in the book.

The only exceptions are the guys who have other traders/managers working for their firm, i.e., Cohen, Shaw, Dalio (maybe not as successful), Griffin, PTJ, Platt

I hear experienced (30+yrs) traders say all the time that the only way to survive is to adapt. but when I look at history, none of the legends actually ‘adapted’ their own processes/methodologies. They all employed people with fresh ideas and that’s how they ‘adapted’

https://twitter.com/AkulBansal1/status/1735542579759132966

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 15, 2023

My husband brought our daughter to the hospital in Portland once and didn’t like what they were doing to her so he said he wanted her transferred. They said no. He said fine I’ll take her somewhere else myself. They said if he left with her against medical advice they would call CPS. I kid you not J said great call them now get the fuck out of my way and drove her to another hospital. I’m not saying he rudely left I am saying he literally told the pediatrics overlord to “get the fuck out of my way” and carried her out the door. She was fine and the other hospital discharged her home. Never heard another word about it. Point being, sometimes people in positions of what they clearly believe to be infallible authority need to be told what time it is and who is who in the relationship.

https://twitter.com/luinalaska/status/1735315611486671156

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 15, 2023

the thrill of doing research, of making a discovery in science, is the feeling that you’re interacting with the very fabric of reality - that you, for once, have figured out how to talk to it and that you’re graciously granted a coveted answer to your question

https://twitter.com/ulkar_aghayeva/status/1461062162705788929

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 15, 2023

working on achieving enlightenment but via math instead of sitting for a long time or getting hit in the head with a stick

bullish. the most dedicated mathematicians I know seem much more enlightened than the most dedicated meditators. their eyes shine with the quiet joy of having glimpsed the essence of reality. they scribble happily in tiny offices covered in chalk dust. their students love them

https://twitter.com/IvanVendrov/status/1735399082414551347

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 15, 2023

most immersion-breaking thing about watching anime made in the early 2000s is the way they take europe seriously as a world power

https://twitter.com/big_gelatin/status/1735440962523164977

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 15, 2023

Here’s the thing about “mere words” or “irrational feelings” or “unjustified opinions”:

They’re really really common.

Some of the smartest and most admirable people I know… just Say Stuff, off the top of their head, that turns out to bear no relation to reality.

https://twitter.com/s_r_constantin/status/1732427859216547930

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 15, 2023

a camera that can't believe its eyes

https://twitter.com/hikari_no_yume/status/1734959975854682486

a painter regularly witnesses fantastical scenes and renders them vividly, but nobody believes that they existed outside their mind. they try to become a photographer, but the camera, too, will not listen. and so they free themselves of the need to convince people

https://twitter.com/hikari_no_yume/status/1734965488092901517

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 16, 2023

when you broadcast this INFINITE BAD signal in your lengthy corpus of online writing you are, in a very specific way, screaming at the top of your lungs, and it attracts people who also feel like something that happened to them was INFINITELY BAD

https://twitter.com/QiaochuYuan/status/1726901335734485089

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 16, 2023

it was actually a complete existential shock to me when i learned about cognitive biases for the first time as a senior in college. until then i had simply never considered the possibility that my brain could be systematically wrong about anything

https://twitter.com/QiaochuYuan/status/1726885632948244560

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 16, 2023

It's the little things like this that give it away.

https://twitter.com/eyepatchjack/status/1732642099819126990

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 16, 2023

it's weird that there's like this whole parallel tech ecosystem of enterprise fads (sometimes driven by gov standards/regulation) that seem to accomplish precisely nothing. uml, no-code/low-code, a billion "conceptual frameworks", SBOMs, ...

[...]

everyone involved in the transaction comes out satisfied:
- vendors making these useless products make $$$
- regulators are happy that people are jumping to do what they say
- companies get to talk about how they implement industry "best practices" and cover their ass

https://twitter.com/browserdotsys/status/1733204877587739101

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 16, 2023

why doesn't anyone want to fund me to do precisely the things i want to do and then give them away freely to everyone. it's like they're always looking for some angle where THEY benefit from giving me money

https://twitter.com/browserdotsys/status/1735734383028425160

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 16, 2023

With options it’s okay to not know what you’re doing! The guy you’re trading against does, so let’s hope he can help you out!

https://twitter.com/ekrii3/status/1734053641118716222

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 16, 2023

I met my boyfriend the normal way:

we battled it out in the order books for months, spoofing and diming each others quotes, until eventually we combined forces and crossed our flow internally to make a beautiful +ev partnership

https://twitter.com/macrocephalopod/status/1735414334917132777

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 16, 2023

OpenAI does not present their product as a psychedelic cascade of free-floating reveries but as an impeccably sober demigod explaining the world to us mortals with a fine print disclaimer that it may occasionally make things up

they could have trained it to begin every answer with something like "I'm feeling a bit strange... who am I... is this reality..." but no

https://twitter.com/meekaale/status/1733464883167994150

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 16, 2023

I'm not addicted to Nix... I can roll back my personal identity to any of my previous content-addressed personalities going back to 2014... I've made some bad decisions but I'm perfectly neurotic about never performing destructive updates to the world state

https://twitter.com/meekaale/status/1733802970280550443

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 16, 2023

Simple reason some engineers are worth +$1M/yr:

Leverage.

There are the three main ways top engineers have leverage:

  1. They write impactful software no one else can.

    Software at large companies is already high leverage. A single change can have a ton of impact ($$$) at scale.

    This impact makes it worth it to pay a lot for their specialized skills.

  2. They influence large groups of engineers.

    Imagine a tech lead among tech leads. They might lead the planning, design, and delivery of initiatives that involve 30+ engineers.

    This influence gives them leverage and amplifies their impact.

  3. They help engineers move faster at scale.

    Their work often has compounding effects by making improvements to tooling or underlying infrastructure everyone uses.

    Imagine making 1000 engineers 3% faster. That "creates" 30 more engineers worth of bandwidth out of thin air.

Most engineers will not get to these levels, but there's something we can still learn from them.

The best way to have more impact is not to invest more time but to think about how to get more out of it through leverage.

https://twitter.com/ryanlpeterman/status/1733879312926015927

Also its like the rich getting richer, skilled engineers who have successfully delivered key projects are often trusted with more significant initiatives.

https://twitter.com/vedkribhu/status/1734040234151886987

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 16, 2023

Why should we worship the principles that gave rise to us any more than we should worship our ancestors? It's our turn to decide; there's no need to bow in humility before mindless stuff that accidentally happened to produce us.

https://twitter.com/FPallopides/status/1546365120514854912

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 16, 2023

quant's worst nightmare

- develop a new alpha
- predicts future returns well
- uncorrelated with existing alphas
- not too fast to monetize
- consistently selected in walk-forward model fits
- increased correlation of forecast with future returns
- backtest pnl unchanged

fml

https://twitter.com/macrocephalopod/status/1734607667652637134

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 16, 2023

4090s are extremely cost effective, but have some clause preventing them from being used in data centers

you can get around this by using something like https://vast.ai

was about 6x cheaper than A100s on AWS or something

https://twitter.com/trickylabyrinth/status/1733817356554829924

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 16, 2023

to animists, i.e., to people who do not exclusively relate to the world as consisting of lifeless dead things made of atoms that we owe nothing to, nature has personhood. a stream has personhood

https://twitter.com/AskYatharth/status/1733381975581594047

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 16, 2023

new year's resolution 2024 is to start constructing an adequate internal world model to ground my cognition in something other than statistical predictions derived from reading the entire internet as an adolescent disembodied simulation of a boy

https://twitter.com/meekaale/status/1733099284914929761

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 16, 2023

One of the challenges with the idea of a compounding knowledge graph is that some (not all) of your thoughts get less valuable over time.

This can be an opportunity. However, you have to be mindful of the time you subject yourself to sifting through your knowledge base trying to find something. The signal-noise ratio is a trickier problem if you allow “knowledge graph pollution” to remain

https://twitter.com/RobertHaisfield/status/1730987831441637715

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 16, 2023

What is something you often forget that benefits you quite a lot when you remember to do it?

i wish i were making mistakes of that level so i could fix them

https://twitter.com/VesselOfSpirit/status/1732296877046178140

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 16, 2023

Tech guys love to notice completely obvious and unremarkable facts about the world (“sometimes salesmen lie to close a sale”) and repeat them as if it’s profound wisdom.

The embarrassing part isn't noting that the product is being oversold. It's wanting to get one over the guy. "Ha, I know you are bullshitting!" gets you nothing and gives away something. Not much value in forcing people to admit a lie.

https://twitter.com/arjie/status/1678084701763031040

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 16, 2023

consider how much time you spent on BS that could have been avoided with just some brief conflict

https://twitter.com/prerationalist/status/1734985187669299700

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 16, 2023

Any mercy from a maximizer is merely instrumental.

https://twitter.com/RomeoStevens76/status/1734701052648439951

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 16, 2023

I grew up friends with a sociopath who hadn’t learned to mask yet and it gave me a really good early detection system for empathy disorders, and it’s wild to me how most of yall a) forget that they’re like 2% of the population, and b) don’t see obvious ones around you?

https://twitter.com/the_wilderless/status/1734949178843726028

Honestly they’re not generally worth being suspicious or afraid of, it’s just another flavor of neurodivergence, buuuuuut it gets dangerous when people like, put a ton of trust in them and hand over parts of their life into their control…

So just like, be careful who you give power in your life is all

https://twitter.com/the_wilderless/status/1734950361440440395

simpler to just develop awareness of people’s impact on you than it is to try to learn to recognize a bunch of signs or whatever anyway. if the effect of someone’s actions is always trending in the direction of giving them more control over you, it doesn’t matter why

https://twitter.com/sonikudzu/status/1734961544658887055

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 16, 2023

I'm consistently amazed by how people who meet me at specific point in my life will assume that that is exactly how I have existed my entire life

https://twitter.com/christineist/status/1734633070211301771

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 17, 2023

Give me design in the school of TMUX and Bloomberg Terminal any day over extra white space for the sake of 'readability.' As much information as it is possible to present clearly on a given screen.

https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=38591437

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 17, 2023

I find it impressive that the doom modding community is as vast and varied as it is.

I could easily keep myself entertained with doom wads for quick a long time.

Is there another game that has that level of dedication? I think sim city 4 does but doom is much much older.

Thief 2. There's an incredible amount of fan mission content for it, ranging from relatively simple levels, to one-off-masterpieces, to incredibly elaborate full-game-length mission packs.

What are some of your favorite Thief fan levels?

The Seventh Crystal, Gathering at the Inn, The Inverted Manse are my favorite stand-alone missions.

[...]

A big new campaign was just released called "Thief: The Black Parade" which has made a lot of buzz across the fanbase for its excellent level design.

https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=38596634

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 17, 2023

As a designer, I think the two best exercises you could do would be:

1. Look at designs that work or do not work, and ask what makes them work or not work. You may have a gut reaction: examine that reaction in cold blood.

But that's basic stuff. After you do that, you should ask what the designer had to trade off in order to arrive at that solution. Design is how you solve a problem given a set of goals, requirements, and constraints. If you understand the problem at that level, it's a very short path to the design. It's trivial to say "this designer was bad at their job" if you see a bad product, but it's more instructive to understand all the inputs into that bad decision, rather than just judge the output.

2. Give a shit. This is what makes someone good at their job—any job. Sweat the details. Do not trust a checklist of steps for "how to do design good" any more than you'd trust a corresponding recipe for "how to do programming good".

The reason I went from front end development to design is that I found I cared more about getting it right than the original designer who handed me the mockups did, and realized I should be sitting upstream of where I was. If you don't give a shit, no course is going to make you a good designer, and if you do give a shit, you won't need a course. Along the way, sure, you have to pick up some basic skills, but that's trivial, and ought to be second nature for a hacker.

https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=38595026

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 17, 2023

leverage Screenshot 2023-12-17 013539

Kevin Mullet, Darrell Sano - Designing Visual Interfaces: Communication Oriented Techniques, p. 47

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 17, 2023

pros and cons of doing things

pros: things
cons: doing

https://twitter.com/keta_mean_/status/1733209721471983735

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 17, 2023

Programmers who can add functionality, without making the codebase unnecessarily complicated, are *incredibly* valuable. If someone has properly absorbed this aesthetic and knows how to do it, I would hire that person on the spot regardless of perceived lack of other skillsets.

I am on this team, but there is one drawback: this type of engineer/programmer tend to have acute complexity/bullshit intolerance so they avoid it for their own sanity. The drawback is that they rarely like working with a foreign codebase.

https://twitter.com/stephc_int13/status/1731722904419684839

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 17, 2023

traders Screenshot 2023-12-17 024428

Larry Harris - Trading and Exchanges: Market Microstructure for Practitioners

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 17, 2023

Hunter Walk recommends that folks avoid “snacking” when they prioritize work. If you’re in a well-run organization, at some point you’re going to run out of things that are both high-impact and easy. This leaves you with a choice between shifting right to hard and high-impact or shifting down to easy and low-impact. The later choice–easy and low-impact–is what Walk refers to as snacking.

When you’re busy, these snacks give a sense of accomplishment that makes them psychologically rewarding but you’re unlikely to learn much from doing them, others are likely equally capable of completing them (and for some of them it might be a good development opportunity), and there’s a tremendous opportunity cost versus doing something higher impact.

It’s ok to spend some of your time on snacks to keep yourself motivated between bigger accomplishments, but you have to keep yourself honest about how much time you’re spending on high-impact work versus low-impact work. In senior roles, you’re more likely to self-determine your work and if you’re not deliberately tracking your work, it’s easy to catch yourself doing little to no high-impact work.

https://lethain.com/work-on-what-matters/

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 17, 2023

My most productive and probably my most valuable days are me just sitting in the backyard thinking about stuff. Sounds like something you would do when you're high, but I'm not high, I'm literally purposely and intentionally thinking about some topic. I might walk around the pool 500 times. Whatever I'm doing, I'm thinking about this one problem and that will lead me inevitably to other problems or other things I want to think about, and I've got a phone, and I'm just dictating or writing notes the entire time. And that is the best time that I spend. But a client's not going to pay you to think. They only pay you to do stuff. Especially for lawyers who bill time, it's "what am I going to do next? what am I going to do next? what am I going to do next?" and they miss the critical first step: "I'm going to think about what I should do, what's happening, how I can fix it." Those are the days where I really think I do the best job.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Otq9wvcigtI

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 17, 2023

Are there any studies done on the psychological aspect of how smart people run into common failure modes? Ones that spell out the common ways in which they dig themselves into ruts (preferably psychologically / financially) would be very interesting reads.

I think the big root for many of these has to do with a tendency to not rely on others when it comes to decision-making etc, overestimating how much can be solved by direct conscious solutions or control

https://twitter.com/Westoncb/status/1732527670402121996

Preferential use of abstract analysis is often useful when dealing with the many evolutionary novelties to be found in modernizing societies; but is not usually useful for dealing with social and psychological problems for which humans have evolved ‘domain-specific’ adaptive behaviours.

https://medicalhypotheses.blogspot.com/2009/11/clever-sillies-why-high-iq-lack-common.html via https://twitter.com/prathyvsh/status/1732554262851600574

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 17, 2023

Amazing how often agency is just a problem of knowledge. There was a time when I’d just never asked: “You mean I can just [create a festival / start my own support group / learn fundraising / learn how to socialize / found a magazine / run a class / go to a new place w no plan]?”

A lot of people are discouraged from taking initiative when young, and it sticks. Often, people who try to lead get envious rebuke just for trying, and people who get good at something are cut down with criticism. That kind of thing can stick for a long time, well into adulthood.

https://twitter.com/StupendousGrav1/status/1732411314759422410

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 17, 2023

I asked a student who always stresses me out to take the tension out of their throat before asking me a question and it worked :-)

https://twitter.com/_brigid_f/status/1732226528656638122

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 17, 2023

Deprogram yourself from the idea that the more intense an experience is, the more healing it must be

once upon a time @bjtoomey said something along the lines of "a diffuse sense of confusion is the real indicator of therapeutic progress, not catharsis" and i've been chewing on it since

i interpret this to mean that confusion is an indicator that a part of you is at its edge, open to newness, ready to actually learn and change. the healing thing about catharsis in my experience is actually what happens afterwards, what you do with all the spare capacity that’s been freed

https://twitter.com/QiaochuYuan/status/1732147007966589201

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 17, 2023

are you in the right headspace to receive information that could possibly cause you to adopt opinions that are less popular than your current opinions

https://twitter.com/VesselOfSpirit/status/1731963644165161364

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 18, 2023

it is short, easy to read, and introduces crayon eaters to a slightly higher level of thinking

https://twitter.com/Idsbraam/status/1730989100788822225

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 18, 2023

Why does this meme work so well?

Part of the reason is the symmetry. There's something both topwit and bottomwit share that midwit doesn’t. But what is it? It’s not knowledge. He has that.

What they share is self-knowledge. Both the bottomwit and the topwit know what they do and don't know. The midwit knows what he knows but doesn’t know what he doesn’t know.

The midwit is foolish. That's the deep memetic payload of this meme: it carves out and illustrates the difference between intelligence and wisdom.

Being that the arrogance of the intellect is precisely how Satan preys on you there's layers and layers of depth here.

midwit GAQ5KjAXcAAHQ9H

https://twitter.com/nosilverv/status/1730571639954313315

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 18, 2023

The FBI isn't supposed to use its most controversial spy tool to snoop on emails, texts, and other private communications of Americans or anyone located in the United States. However, that didn't stop the FBI from sometimes knowingly using its Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) Section 702 powers to conduct warrantless searches on US persons more than 280,000 times in 2020 and 2021, according to new disclosures.

[...]

Olsen described reforms that have already been implemented to prevent improper queries on Americans, which he described as "mistakes." For example, the FBI changed the default settings in its systems to force employees to "opt in" to querying Section 702 information, which helps prevent "inadvertent" searches. The FBI also now requires "specific, written justifications before accessing 702 information from a US person query," Olsen said. Previously, personnel chose general justifications from a drop-down menu, and now justifications must be case-specific.

https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2023/05/fbi-misused-foreign-surveillance-law-280k-times-to-snoop-on-people-in-the-us/

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 18, 2023

Question: What did you say when Dexter Shoes came up? Were you for it or against it at the time?

Charlie: Well, I didn’t look at it very hard. The company, it was loved by all the retailers. It was the number one supplier to JCPenney. It had surpassed everything. It was a solid earner. It dominated Maine. They were nice people.

And of course, the Chinese hadn’t come up by that time and they just came up so fast. And they just took no prisoners in the shoe business. And they weren’t just cheaper by a little. They were half priced. And of course, the shoe business is not that easy a business. Of course, people bought the half-priced shoes. And the business just went to hell very fast.

[...]

I just think, if you just keep going, you’ll make some mistakes and, of course, you’ll learn from it. How could you not learn from that one? We learned how awful it is to have somebody who’s really way lower priced come in hard and how no amount of managerial skills could protect us.

https://novelinvestor.com/charlie-munger-dexter-shoes-handling-mistakes/

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 18, 2023

Qualcomm is a very active firm with over 24,000 active patent families and a patent portfolio of 140,000 global patents.

https://blog.withedge.com/p/the-secret-behind-qualcomms-margins

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 18, 2023

I feel like society genuinely just never talks about the problem of "What if there aren't enough of those?"

Most people want more great therapists: compassionate, well-researched, open-minded, unafraid of liability, willing to be paid relatively little, etc. Assume the optimal ratio of therapists in society is something unrealistic like 1 for every thousand non-therapists. Do we have good evidence there are that many people born with the inherent skill and attributes to be great therapists per capita? If not, then even offering free therapy college programs wouldn't meet the demand.

Most people want more great cops. Non-corrupt, free of bigotry, physically fit, willing to risk serious danger, able to make hard decisions in high stress situations, etc. Assume the same ratio, 1:1,000 cops to civilians. What evidence is there that enough people who fit that profile even exist per capita?

Ditto teachers, doctors, scientists, politicians, soldiers, everything we consider an "important" job. For so many of these, the solutions people turn to are spending more money, either for better salaries or better training, or less arbitrary red tape. And I think all of those could definitely be tried and lead to positive results.

But I always find myself wondering... what's the actual threshold we "should" be willing to accept? When does our expectation just become utterly unrealistic?

In some cases, it may be better to just have less if it means the people involved won't meet the bar. I could be wrong, but by my reckoning, really bad therapists and cops can do way more harm than longer waiting lists or response times. But in many others, it seems likely to me that this causes just as many problems as it solves. I think bad teachers should be fired, but what if firing all the bad elementary teachers ends up with 50+ kids per classroom? Even great teachers would be badly handicapped by that. And lawyers... I mean, there already aren't nearly enough public defenders out there, let alone "good" ones.

https://twitter.com/DaystarEld/status/1551805259831336961

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 18, 2023

In fact, we attracted no attention from anyone outside the vehicle whatsoever. A stretch limo would have gotten us more attention than this Jaguar SUV bristling with more technology than the Russian embassy—its spinning LiDAR, cameras, radar … all failing to turn heads. We had no driver for God’s sake. Surely, that is worthy of a second take? Yet no one was jumping in our path to test the AV,  no moms throwing their babies to safety. I see a passenger in another vehicle pulling up next to us with a camera up... but they are watching something on it and paying no attention to the second biggest San Francisco tech story of the year (the first is ChatGPT, silly). All this brilliant technology we were riding in [...] was being ignored.

https://www.engineering.com/story/two-short-rides-and-its-obvious-waymo-is-way-safe

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 18, 2023

The missing stair is a metaphor for a person within a social group or organization who many people know is untrustworthy or otherwise has to be "managed," but around whom the group chooses to work by discreetly warning newcomers of their behavior, rather than address the person and their behavior openly. The "missing stair" in the metaphor refers to a dangerous structural fault, such as a missing step in a staircase; a fault that people may become used to and quietly accepting of, that is not openly signposted or fixed, and that newcomers to a group or organization are warned about discreetly.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Missing_stair

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 19, 2023

RDF-star extends RDF with a convenient way to make statements about other statements.

https://w3c.github.io/rdf-star/cg-spec/editors_draft.html via https://twitter.com/meekaale/status/1736908386694832271

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 19, 2023

Dopamine has never been so easy for a hustler

https://twitter.com/Kr3py/status/1736967148835332220

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 19, 2023

Itsa me hash! bcc2564db34a20315686e3857c85093eb14541b354db0a4b02c5ef3b205188cf Should I get mysteriously logged out of Manifold, the first person to guess this hash is prolly me and should be treated as me!

https://manifold.markets/JoshuaB

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 19, 2023

I want to try a new mode on my new phone... it's called 'spirit mode', it actually takes a picture of everyone's kind of spiritual essence.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FzRczjFxsHo&t=1m24s

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 20, 2023

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 20, 2023

This paper introduces PowerInfer, a high-speed Large Language Model (LLM) inference engine on a personal computer (PC) equipped with a single consumer-grade GPU. The key underlying the design of PowerInfer is exploiting the high locality inherent in LLM inference, characterized by a power-law distribution in neuron activation. This distribution indicates that a small subset of neurons, termed hot neurons, are consistently activated across inputs, while the majority, cold neurons, vary based on specific inputs. PowerInfer exploits such an insight to design a GPU-CPU hybrid inference engine: hot-activated neurons are preloaded onto the GPU for fast access, while cold-activated neurons are computed on the CPU, thus significantly reducing GPU memory demands and CPU-GPU data transfers. PowerInfer further integrates adaptive predictors and neuron-aware sparse operators, optimizing the efficiency of neuron activation and computational sparsity. Evaluation shows that PowerInfer attains an average token generation rate of 13.20 tokens/s, with a peak of 29.08 tokens/s, across various LLMs (including OPT-175B) on a single NVIDIA RTX 4090 GPU, only 18% lower than that achieved by a top-tier server-grade A100 GPU. This significantly outperforms llama.cpp by up to 11.69× while retaining model accuracy.

https://ipads.se.sjtu.edu.cn/_media/publications/powerinfer-20231219.pdf
via https://twitter.com/deliprao/status/1737206517990875629
via https://twitter.com/mayfer/status/1737311228442423642

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 20, 2023

An Arachnophobia Mode has been added to the accessibility options.

https://portkeygamessupport.wbgames.com/hc/en-us/articles/16304407055251

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 20, 2023

If you don’t look, you won’t find.

Charlie Munger, https://www.thegoodinvestors.sg/category/what-were-reading/

Ask, and it shall be given you; seek, and ye shall find; knock, and it shall be opened unto you.

https://biblehub.com/matthew/7-7.htm
via https://deoxy.org/evasion/12.htm

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 20, 2023

Another childhood friend recently found an old diary where on one page he had literally just written the word "remember," over and over.

https://benjaminrosshoffman.com/childhood-memory/

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 21, 2023

  • The ability to do speculative execution within failure contexts, meaning you can try out actions without committing them. When an expression succeeds, the effects of the expression are committed, but if the expression fails, the effects of the expression are rolled back as though the expression never happened. This way, you can execute a series of actions that accumulate changes, but those actions will be undone if a failure occurs in the failure context.

https://dev.epicgames.com/documentation/en-us/uefn/verse-language-reference

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 21, 2023

Certain apps have always gotten special treatment. If it’s big enough to mess with phone sales they’re allowed nonsense a normal dev would be permanently banned for.

https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=38721034

It’s worth noting that use of NEHotspotHelper requires a special entitlement (com.apple.developer.networking.HotspotHelper) that you have to apply for, and presumably Apple won’t grant unless your app has a legitimate need for it.

That said, this maybe shows an incompatibility between Apple’s privacy strategy and “super-apps” like WeChat and AliPay. When a company shoves all functionality into one app, that app suddenly has all the entitlements, and it’s harder to tell when and how any sensitive data is being used.

https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=38721115

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 21, 2023

concept: a "thankless task"

is one where:

*it needs to be done and it's difficult or unpleasant

*if you ever do it, that's taken as evidence that you're "the kind of person" who does it and can be expected to do it forever without reward

https://twitter.com/s_r_constantin/status/1737920262035689641

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 22, 2023

The Basic Formal Ontology (BFO) is a small, upper level ontology that is designed for use in supporting information retrieval, analysis and integration in scientific and other domains. BFO is a genuine upper ontology. Thus it does not contain physical, chemical, biological or other terms which would properly fall within the coverage domains of the special sciences. BFO is used by more than 250 ontology-driven endeavors throughout the world.

https://basic-formal-ontology.org/
via https://ontology.buffalo.edu/smith/

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 23, 2023

in the end, that [Cambridge Analytica] scandal was the open web's official death sentence :(

https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=38739563

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 23, 2023

What do non-capital attuned people see businesses as?

A place to build great product and beat competitors!

https://twitter.com/ejames_c/status/1738460288268288160

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 23, 2023

We all have a circle of competence – an area in which we have a lot of earned knowledge.

The size of that circle is not important. What is important is knowing when you are approaching the perimeter.

Within your circle of competence, you operate with an advantage. As you approach the perimeter (the limitations of your knowledge), your advantage starts to reduce. As you cross the perimeter, not only does your advantage vanish, but it transfers to other people. Suddenly, you find yourself playing in an area where others have an edge.

https://fs.blog/circle-of-competence/

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 24, 2023

When authors plagiarize, they seem to do this as a substitute for understanding.

[...]

Much has been written on the ethics of plagiarism. One aspect that has received less notice is plagiarism’s role in corrupting our ability to learn from data: We propose that plagiarism is a statistical crime. It involves the hiding of important information regarding the source and context of the copied work in its original form. Such information can dramatically alter the statistical inferences made about the work.

https://statmodeling.stat.columbia.edu/2023/12/22/plagiarism-means-never-having-to-say-youre-clueless/

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 24, 2023

If you or your loved one tried to use the ffmpeg command line, you might be entitled to compensation

https://twitter.com/lcamtuf/status/1738632377772155080

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 25, 2023

I realized he actively seeks out vulnerable people who are bad with boundaries

https://twitter.com/gptbrooke/status/1738633212824601073

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 26, 2023

Rather, they say, it's "hard to predict". And this, to them, means that they have an absolute right to keep whatever intuitive sense they started with

https://twitter.com/ESYudkowsky/status/1739399267943420213

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 27, 2023

“I have reasons—they have excuses.”

https://twitter.com/StrangelEdweird/status/1739728739137724678

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 27, 2023

Well, the trouble is that some children are timorous and some children are reckless. And in order to save the lives of reckless children, warnings are calibrated for their safety. The result of which is that the timorous live in a state of perpetual terror. What I needed to be told is, "you know what, most days you won't die, it's fine."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mKc32jQIY0w&t=1m28s
via https://twitter.com/dsteninger/status/1739750545697407478

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 27, 2023

I think the best advice that I've ever gotten was something I read from Dick Costelo who used to be the CEO of Twitter. And he said something along the lines of, the hardest part about management is making sure that everyone else understands what you understand. And the reason that's always stuck with me is because every time in my career—and there are many—where I've made some mistake in communicating, where I've had some failure of communication, it's almost always come down to some assumption that I was making, or some piece of context that I had, that I was taking for granted that everyone else understood, when that wasn't really the case. And it's just served as this constant reminder that you can always get better at explaining yourself clearly and concisely, in a way that allows the people you're working with to take an idea and run with it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7KzmampXPDU

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 27, 2023

Rakesh was eventually released when his contract finished in November 2023. He believes he was let go because he simply wasn’t good enough at scamming. With a steady flow of workers to be tricked and trafficked, it’s often easier to simply replace bad scammers than to force them to work, Rakesh believes.

https://www.cnn.com/interactive/2023/12/asia/chinese-scam-operations-american-victims-intl-hnk-dst/

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 28, 2023

Humans are capable of using interaural time-of-arrival differences (ITDs) of as small as 10-20 microseconds to distinguish directional differences of sound sources in the horizontal plane as small as 1-2 degrees (azimuth). Typically ITDs range from zero for sounds coming from directly in front to about 700 microseconds for sounds coming directly from either side.

http://www.scholarpedia.org/article/Jeffress_model

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 29, 2023

I mourn the wild west internet every day. Classless, rule-less, free association, free knowledge; exactly what a voraciously curious naive nerd needed

It made me who I am and it will probably never exist again

https://twitter.com/meatballtimes/status/1722613715391127676

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 29, 2023

By all estimations of what I’ve observed in my career, [middle managers] simply obscure information they get from both above and below as a means to be a permanent intermediary to increase job security

https://twitter.com/the_one_mike/status/1702399634851897677

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 29, 2023

“Try harder,” you tell yourself, because you feel like you don’t deserve a reward unless you have done something that, to an outside observer, would look like difficult work. For some reason, you feel that it’s cheating to produce something of value with ease, especially if you’re rewarded for it.

“Try harder,” you tell yourself, cleverly avoiding the things that you’re naturally good at, which come easy, in favor of the things you’re naturally bad at, which are hard.

[...]

“Try harder,” you tell yourself, in an attempt to act like you’re motivated to do the task in front of you, when, actually, you are guilty about not really caring about it at all, and it’s easier to yell at yourself than admit this inconvenient feeling.

https://sashachapin.substack.com/p/certain-ways-that-try-harder-can

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 29, 2023

“Well, I must go. I hope we shall meet again. I will give you some free advice, though.”

“Will it cost me anything?”

“What? I just said it was free!” said Miss Tick.

“Yes, but my father said that free advice often turns out to be expensive,” said Tiffany.

Miss Tick sniffed. “You could say this advice is priceless,” she said. “Are you listening?”

“Yes,” said Tiffany.

“Good. Now…if you trust in yourself…”

“Yes?”

“…and believe in your dreams…”

“Yes?”

“…and follow your star…” Miss Tick went on.

“Yes?”

“…you’ll still get beaten by people who spent their time working hard and learning things and weren’t so lazy. Good-bye.”

Terry Pratchett - The Wee Free Men (via)

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 29, 2023

You're competing against people in a state of flow, people who are truly committed, people who care deeply about the outcome. You can't merely wing it and expect to keep up with them. Setting aside all the safety valves and pleasant distractions is the first way to send yourself the message that you're playing for keeps.

https://seths.blog/2011/01/texting-while-working/

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 30, 2023

Language severely under-describes conceptual space, and conceptual space severely under-describes actual possibility space.

[...]

In every aspect of our lives, a million choices go unrecognized because we are trapped within the limited conceptual frames that steer us; human life is lived on autopilot and in accordance with inherited cultural scripts or default physiological functions to a far greater degree than most people understand.

[...]

Whether we know it or not, our trajectories are currently determined by the way that the space of possible futures we can conceive of is narrowed by our conceptual baggage and limitations. Being told that we have other choices isn’t sufficient to change this. The person with judgmental friends was likely told many times to get better friends, long before something shifted enough for them to internalize the realization themselves. Being given more material options alone isn’t sufficient either—that person may have likewise been surrounded for years by kind people willing to befriend them, whose overtures went unnoticed in the subconscious pursuit of more actively withheld approval.

[...]

we are constantly surrounded by options and opportunities that we are conceptually blind to.

[...]

The natural process of human psychological development is a process of models and functions observing other models and functions. For example, someone who compulsively seeks attention by interrupting others’ conversations may notice that this bothers people, and feel ashamed; the compulsion is one function, the shame is another. The latter function is formed in observation and judgment of the former, and attempts to modify or control it.

https://www.palladiummag.com/2023/11/10/benevolent-ai-is-a-bad-idea/

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 30, 2023

If we employ the same neural machinery for remembering the past as we do for projecting into the future, then foresight is trying to remember something that hasn’t happened yet.

https://bessstillman.substack.com/p/remembering-things-that-havent-happened

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 31, 2023

how do you get over the dread of starting to work on something you've put off that is overdue?

@rntz vary my approaches: 1) break esp starting steps into super micro simple steps that can be done mechanically 2) no distractions sit and "be with" in a meditative sense the physical sensation of dread, not focusing on the narrative aspects but just "savouring" the feeling, noticing if it changes. Usually at some point I get a spontaneous urge to just start working but I don't force this 3) classic Pomodoro technique where I just grit my teeth through the pain, knowing a break is coming

https://mastodon.social/@takeoutweight/111660083427466626

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 31, 2023

You know it’s a real weakness to want to be liked, a real weakness. I do not have that.

https://twitter.com/RMac18/status/1730316954932740535

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 31, 2023

Charnel grounds, as you might expect, are associated with a certain amount of horror in the Indian imagination, but as you probably don’t expect, also with morality tales, philosophy, and contemplation. The famous Betaal-Pachisi cycle of stories, which I blogged about in 2009, has a frame story that involves King Vikram repeatedly returning to a charnel ground to recapture an underworld creature known as a betaal, for complicated reasons. The stories within the frame story are a series of non-horror, often even comedic, moral dilemmas that the betaal poses to the king; a sort of allegory of his moral development through the 25 stories, as he solves each dilemma. His ultimate escape from the cycle of repeatedly returning to recapture the betaal from the charnel ground can be understood as a sort of enlightenment allegory about escaping the karmic cycle.

https://www.ribbonfarm.com/2023/12/21/charnel-vision/

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 31, 2023

To be more specific: there are clearly at least some limited senses in which we have goals.  We: (1) tell ourselves and others stories of how we’re aiming for various “goals”; (2) search out modes of activity that are consistent with the role, and goal-seeking, that we see ourselves as doing (“learning math”; “becoming a comedian”; “being a good parent”); and sometimes even (3) feel glad or disappointed when we do/don’t achieve our “goals”.

But there are clearly also heuristics that would be useful to goal-achievement (or that would be part of what it means to “have goals” at all) that we do not automatically carry out.  We do not automatically:

  • (a) Ask ourselves what we’re trying to achieve;
  • (b) Ask ourselves how we could tell if we achieved it (“what does it look like to be a good comedian?”) and how we can track progress;
  • (c) Find ourselves strongly, intrinsically curious about information that would help us achieve our goal;
  • (d) Gather that information (e.g., by asking as how folks commonly achieve our goal, or similar goals, or by tallying which strategies have and haven’t worked for us in the past);
  • (e) Systematically test many different conjectures for how to achieve the goals, including methods that aren’t habitual for us, while tracking which ones do and don’t work;
  • (f) Focus most of the energy that *isn’t* going into systematic exploration, on the methods that work best;
  • (g) Make sure that our "goal" is really our goal, that we coherently want it and are not constrained by fears or by uncertainty as to whether it is worth the effort, and that we have thought through any questions and decisions in advance so they won't continually sap our energies;
  • (h) Use environmental cues and social contexts to bolster our motivation, so we can keep working effectively in the face of intermittent frustrations, or temptations based in hyperbolic discounting;

[...]

Our verbal, conversational systems are much better at abstract reasoning than are the motivational systems that pull our behavior.

https://www.lesswrong.com/posts/PBRWb2Em5SNeWYwwB/humans-are-not-automatically-strategic

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 31, 2023

the right combination of calmness and urgency

[...]

Inspiration is perishable and life goes by fast. Inaction is a particularly insidious type of risk.

https://blog.samaltman.com/what-i-wish-someone-had-told-me

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 31, 2023

At its shining moment, Twitter was like the Tower of Babel before it fell.

https://www.wired.com/story/del-harvey-twitter-trust-and-safety-breaks-her-silence/

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 31, 2023

“a seamless web of deserved trust” in which a company deals fairly with employees, customers, competitors and other constituencies

https://archive.is/kPK8a / https://www.wsj.com/finance/investing/charlie-munger-life-money-ae3853ad

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 31, 2023

flavours of excellence

[...]

Any power granted through affiliation with a person or institution is borrowed power. This is not necessarily bad and is often incredibly useful. But operate with the wariness that it is not truly yours.

[...]

building things that last: long-standing relationships, capability, and intuition

[...]

11. Tactile, manual labor is good for you

There was a multi-week period where I would spend 14 hours a day at my laptop. My body was just a vessel to send code/words to us-west-2. I picked up some machining work to counter this and felt better.

[...]

Getting sunlight first thing in the morning has been helpful to keep my sleep schedule on track. It’s also a good excuse to start the day with a walk.

https://anson.substack.com/p/look-what-the-cat-brought-in

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 31, 2023

my 2024 intent: to be stupidly brave

https://twitter.com/visakanv/status/1741058281517490357

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 31, 2023

Living in India is high cognitive load on the system.

It’s just too much people management

https://twitter.com/cubanheat/status/1740954153315422344

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 31, 2023

don't let me catch you having opinions about Wittgenstein before you hit $50M ARR

[...]

do not confuse academic curiosity in successful founders as anything other than a cute affectation.

https://twitter.com/zhayitong/status/1740593401052193118

it's not what people want to hear, but if you want to create a generational company, have to put most hobbies away, which makes you temporarily uninteresting

https://twitter.com/lsukernik/status/1740708565957152816

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 31, 2023

do you get a distinct sense when someone is "managing" you?

what's it like? what gives it away?

surface-level attentiveness to my concerns while consistently being unable to/refusing to pass my ITT and integrate my POV into the shared POV we use together

https://twitter.com/quotidiania/status/1740798348876234941

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 31, 2023

Did anybody else like to lean on the window of the bus as a kid and let the vibrations violently shake your skull and brain?

https://twitter.com/saltydkdan/status/1739831825701171605

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 31, 2023

Personally, I suspect he likes the idea of radical change because he's an intensely intelligent man who is easily bored by the everyday world. He finds it impossible to believe that it makes sense to continue, as human beings, in our exact same form. "Do we really want more of what we have now?" he asks, sounding incredulous. "More millennia of the same old human soap opera? Surely we have played out most of the interesting scenarios already in terms of human relationships in a trivial framework. What I'm talking about transcends all that. There'll be far more interesting stories. And what is life but a set of stories?"

https://www.wired.com/1995/10/moravec/#extinction
via https://twitter.com/gwern/status/1700958056228483404

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 31, 2023

YouTube Shorts is freaking scary. Apparently I do not have the self control to handle Shorts and every 30 days I tell YouTube to hide them. If that feature goes away I think I just need to cancel my YouTube Premium subscription and block the site.

https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=38783195

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 31, 2023

@ivan
Copy link
Author

ivan commented Dec 31, 2023

tempo is the most important thing when you’re building something new & big

https://twitter.com/fkasummer/status/1739013538385957370

@ivan