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@indragiek
indragiek / CStringArray.swift
Last active Nov 14, 2019
Helper for working with char ** in Swift
View CStringArray.swift
// Copyright © 2015 Indragie Karunaratne. All rights reserved.
//
// Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy
// of this software and associated documentation files (the "Software"), to deal
// in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the rights
// to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell
// copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is
// furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions:
//
// The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in
@mattt
mattt / nshipster-new-years-2015.md
Created Nov 25, 2014
NSHipster New Year's 2015
View nshipster-new-years-2015.md

Season's Greetings, NSHipsters!

As the year winds down, and we take a moment to reflect on our experiences over the past months, one thing is clear: 2014 has been an incredible year professionally for Apple developers. So much has happened in such a short timespan, and yet it's hard to remember our relationship to Objective-C before Swift, or what APIs could have captivated our imagination as much as iOS 8 or WatchKit.

It's an NSHipster tradition to ask you, dear readers, to send in your favorite tips and tricks from the past year for publication over the New Year's holiday. This year, with the deluge of new developments—both from Cupertino and the community at large—there should be no shortage of interesting tidbits to share.

Submit your favorite piece of Swift or Objective-C trivia, framework arcana, hidden Xcode feature, or anything else you think is cool, and you could have it featured in the year-end blowout article. Just comment on this gist below!

If you're wondering about what to post, look to

View :(
import Foundation
import ImageIO
infix operator >>= { associativity left }
func >>=<A,B>(l: A?, r: A -> B?) -> B? {
if let x = l {
return r(x)
}
return nil
View gist:96da8fe10ecd70d104bc
@interface UIWindow (resize)
-(void)_adjustSizeClassesAndResizeWindowToFrame:(CGRect)frame;
@end
typedef enum _UICustomRes
{
UICustomResiPadTwoThirds,
UICustomResiPadHalf,
UICustomResiPadOneThird,
UICustomResiPhone47,
@nicklockwood
nicklockwood / Hacking UIView Animation Blocks.md
Last active Feb 3, 2020
This article was originally written for objc.io issue 12, but didn't make the cut. It was intended to be read in the context of the other articles, so if you aren't familiar with concepts such as CALayer property animations and the role of actionForKey:, read the articles in that issue first.
View Hacking UIView Animation Blocks.md

Hacking UIView animation blocks for fun and profit

In this article, I'm going to explore a way that we can create views that implement custom Core Animation property animations in a natural way.

As we know, layers in iOS come in two flavours: Backing layers and hosted layers. The only difference between them is that the view acts as the layer delegate for its backing layer, but not for any hosted sublayers.

In order to implement the UIView transactional animation blocks, UIView disables all animations by default and then re-enables them individually as required. It does this using the actionForLayer:forKey: method.

Somewhat strangely, UIView doesn't enable animations for every property that CALayer does by default. A notable example is the layer.contents property, which is animatable by default for a hosted layer, but cannot be animated using a UIView animation block.

View UIApplication+UDCStatusView.m
//
// UIApplication+UDCStatusView.m
// Udacity
//
// Created by Oliver Cameron on 12/5/13.
// Copyright (c) 2013 Udacity. All rights reserved.
//
#import "UIApplication+UDCStatusView.h"
View ArrayHelpers.swift
extension Array {
func first() -> Element? {
if isEmpty {
return nil
}
return self[0]
}
func last() -> Element? {
@raven
raven / Breakpoints_v2.xcbkptlist
Last active Aug 30, 2019
Symbolic breakpoint for dynamically linking libReveal against UIApplicationMain
View Breakpoints_v2.xcbkptlist
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<Bucket
type = "2"
version = "2.0">
<Breakpoints>
<BreakpointProxy
BreakpointExtensionID = "Xcode.Breakpoint.SymbolicBreakpoint">
<BreakpointContent
shouldBeEnabled = "Yes"
ignoreCount = "0"
@steventroughtonsmith
steventroughtonsmith / gist:6763213
Created Sep 30, 2013
Non-opaque application windows in iOS 7, with optional blur. Shows the user's wallpaper under the app, with Parallax if supported.
View gist:6763213
typedef enum _UIBackgroundStyle {
UIBackgroundStyleDefault,
UIBackgroundStyleTransparent,
UIBackgroundStyleLightBlur,
UIBackgroundStyleDarkBlur,
UIBackgroundStyleDarkTranslucent
} UIBackgroundStyle;
@interface UIApplication (UIBackgroundStyle)
-(void)_setBackgroundStyle:(UIBackgroundStyle)style;
@steipete
steipete / UIKitLegacyDetector.m
Last active May 16, 2020
A simple way to detect at runtime if we're running in UIKit legacy mode or the new "flat" variant. Written for our PDF iOS SDK (http://pspdfkit.com), where the precompiled binary needs to detect at runtime in what variant it's running. Want more stuff like that? Follow me on Twitter: http://twitter.com/steipete
View UIKitLegacyDetector.m
// Taken from http://PSPDFKit.com. This snippet is under public domain.
#define UIKitVersionNumber_iOS_7_0 0xB57
BOOL PSPDFIsUIKitFlatMode(void) {
static BOOL isUIKitFlatMode = NO;
static dispatch_once_t onceToken;
dispatch_once(&onceToken, ^{
// We get the modern UIKit if system is running >= iOS 7 and we were linked with >= SDK 7.
if (kCFCoreFoundationVersionNumber >= kCFCoreFoundationVersionNumber_iOS_7_0) {
isUIKitFlatMode = (NSVersionOfLinkTimeLibrary("UIKit") >> 16) >= UIKitVersionNumber_iOS_7_0;
}
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